Tent and pumpio are both kind of failed projects that still have good ideas worth salvaging, IMO.  Though pumpio might be coming around which is nice.
@maiyannah pump.io is a very neat idea. Wish it had a bigger following tbh
@hyper They shot themselves in the foot taking identi.ca the way they did and forcibly defederating it from the existing OStatus network to try to force adoption of the new standard.    and it hasn't recovered from the negative reaction, to this day.

Kind of like Mastodon is talking about doing with ActivityPub, really.

We've seen this song and dance before and it's why I've no intention of playing along.
To be fair, the !StatusNet network that Evan was running became unmanageable -- it cost too much to run, and I think Evan was funding most of it himself (although there were/are a number of paying #StatusNet customers). Evan developed #PumpIO to reduce the number of servers needed to run a federated network, and purposely kept the UI to a minimum to encourage federation. Sadly, that didn't work. Porting identi.ca from StatusNet to PumpIO was intended to introduce people to PumpIO as well as reduce Evan's costs. That partly worked; identi.ca is alive and well as a community, although much reduced from its glory days around 2013. But the #bifurcation did spawn a large number of new StatusNet / !GNUsocial instances, so that was a good thing too. But you're right in that PumpIO never gained widespread traction, the proof of which is in its lack of continued development. In that respect #GNUsocial and !OStatus are more successful than PumpIO
@bob @bobjonkman There is a new #Pump.io maintainer, who is fairly active. But most of Pump's other issues remain, and are worsened by most instances being out of service for >1 year (microca.st's domain is now held by a squatter).
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@lnxw48a1 @bobjonkman @bob

Thanks to you all for fitting pump.io into the larger history of the fediverse with this discussion.

Having kept an eye on it over time still didn't afford me some of the context provided by your exchange.

@deejoe @bobjonkman @bob Happy to be of assistance there.
An additional item to what @bobjonkman wrote:

Part of why Evan P was funding #Identi.ca & #StatusNet mostly out of his own pocket was that he formerly had a VC-funded enterprise behind it, but advertising revenues were weak and users demanded its removal. There were some commercial customers and some individuals that paid, but probably not nearly enough.

He had looked at some #OStatus protocol enhancements that could have improved federation and reduced cost, but many of the component protocols were sponsored by companies like #Google, which was no longer interested in them.
@lnxw48a1 @bob @deejoe @bobjonkman

I don't think *.status.net and identi.ca ever had ad revenue?

IIUC, the idea with StatusNet Inc. was to have enterprises either pay for managed public servers, or have in-house deployments and pay for support and statusnet-based application development.

With heavyweights (with even more VC money and thus heavier marketing) like #yammer moving in around the same time, this never quite panned out.
@notclacke Yes, there were ads on Identi.ca and the zero-price *.status.net sites. Ads went away on the SN cloud before they went away on Identica.

The complaints about ads really got started when whatever company they'd been using was replaced with Google ads. This shortly led to the site going ad-free.
@notclacke @clacke @craigmaloney @bobjonkman The reason I remember is because I had urged Evan to keep ads (not necessarily Google ads), because I didn't believe enough Identica users would financially support the site to keep it running.

(I also ordered a paid SN site and prepaid for a year, but when I couldn't keep paying after that year, they/he didn't close it.)
@lnxw48a1 @bob @deejoe @bobjonkman

I don't think *.status.net and identi.ca ever had ad revenue?

IIUC, the idea with StatusNet Inc. was to have enterprises either pay for managed public servers, or have in-house deployments and pay for support and statusnet-based application development.

With heavyweights (with even more VC money and thus heavier marketing) like #yammer moving in around the same time, this never quite panned out.

@clacke @bobjonkman @deejoe @lnxw48a1 @bob This was my understanding as well. IIRC there was even a whole separate StatusNet set of servers that companies would / could use for their own purposes.

@craigmaloney @bob @lnxw48a1 @deejoe @bobjonkman

Oh yes, this I don't need any qualifiers around, because it was all publicly observable, and I remember it well.

There were several open registration *.status.net servers (maybe the <character-limit>.status.net were all of them), and if you wanted a single-user one that was free too, but if you wanted several users on your own *.status.net server, you had to become a paying customer (or be a non-profit project like https://web.archive.org/web/20100419044824/http://sixgun.status.net/ I guess).

I'm guessing they also offered fully custom domains for managed instances, but I don't know about that.
@clacke @craigmaloney @bob @deejoe @bobjonkman I also think there was a plugin for displaying ads in SN at one time, but I'm sure it is no longer in GS.
@clacke I remember the proposal for putting ads on Identi.ca, and I also remember the huge outcry at the proposal. I don't remember if Evan actually put ads on Identi.ca; if so, it didn't last more than a few weeks. It may have been on a less popular Status.net instance.
@bobjonkman @clacke Evan had advertisements on identi.ca from some ad service called Briar I remember. Not sure if they're still around, but the focused on only promoted !fs or something, I believe.
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