Bridge Over Untroubled Water.

The start of another adventure. Do you know where it is?

My all-time favourite tree (the tall one, to the right of the photo). I have photographed this tree more than any other.

Scots Pine - Giuthas-Albannach - Pinus sylvestris

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This is one of the first photographs I took of the same Scots Pine, in 2009. Note the lack of other trees in the surroundings.

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At the far end of the loch (west end) there is a beautiful sandy beach. As the photo shows this is a popular place for people tenting.

I have no idea what purpose the wee building serves. I didn't try to go inside.

It has a real turf roof with grasses and flowers growing on it. My guess is it is a summerhouse, for sitting comfortably, while gazing along the loch.

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The photographs are all from a walk I did, on Saturday, around Loch Afraig.

openstreetmap.org/?mlat=57.253

The walk takes about three to four hours, depending on how often one stops to take photographs.

Compared to other walks I've done recently this one was quite busy. I saw around 40 people over the 4 hours.

Everyone looked fit and healthy, with tanned complexions, and a spring in their step. They all displayed broad grins. I suppose, like me, they were happy to be in a special place.

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For 95% of the distance the path is excellent. There was a short distance on the north side which was very boggy. I had to step carefully to avoid getting up to my calfs in mud.

The path on the south side was navigable by motor vehicles. On the north side, the path was mostly a broad footpath, as shown in the photograph below.

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A closer view of the house that I described earlier as Idyll #237. Not only is the house beautiful, but the location is stunning.

If it ever comes onto the market, I'll be in there like a shot (laughs up his sleeve).

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Little and Large II

I have often come across small groups of fly agaric mushrooms, but I've never seen so many little & large pairs before. On Saturday I saw 7 pairs of little & large mushrooms. Never more than two, and always the same disparity in size.

Must be something to do with the soil conditions in this area.

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After the four hour walk it was good to get back to the car park, where my late lunch was waiting for me. I ate with relish (not the condiment).

The car park is operated by the Forestry Commission, and they charge two pounds for an all-day ticket. I didn't mind, as the money goes towards the nature reserve upkeep and the provision of the facilities (including very well appointed toilets).

As Arnie once said: "I'll be back".

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@fitheach
That's quite a difference in 9 years. It would be good to see it replicated across the country.

@wizardofosmium
Too true. It shows what can happen by keeping the over-abundance of large herbivores off the land. Re-planting is needed if the desire is for a particular species, in a short timeframe. If you just want trees, natural regeneration is easy.

@fitheach
Natural regeneration has to be the way to go. Glen Feshie is a good example.

@wizardofosmium
It has to be the easiest way. Have you ever planted trees? It is back-breaking work.

We walked up Warklaw hill at the back of Juniper Green this morning and for the first time in years we saw some curlew.

@wizardofosmium
Photo no. 2 really made me laugh. Did he turn around just as you were pressing the shutter?

@fitheach
He hardly stops moving, This was the longest he's sat still while I had the camera out.

@wizardofosmium
Aye, I know that feeling. I have lots of photos of Neachdainn sleeping, the only time when he wasn't running around.

@wim_v12e
Thanks!
I was just lucky; right place, right time.

@wim_v12e
One of the most valuable tips I got from a pro photographer was to always take a portrait and landscape shot of the same view. He did it because it was a requirement for stock photography. I have followed the advice because I sometimes don't see the potential of the other format until I get home.

@fitheach @wim_v12e It's a good habit, and thanks to digital it's essentially free.

In the old film days we had to bracket for exposure, now we should bracket for opportunity.

@tsturm
What is your view on auto bracketing and HDR in the digital age?

@wim_v12e

@fitheach @wim_v12e It's very rare that I even think about bracketing for exposure nowadays, since the sensors has such a high dynamic range - you can almost always recover in post-processing.

If it's extreme light - like shooting into the setting sun - I'll probably try to expose to a few different spots just to make sure... So I never use auto-bracketing.

On my iPhone the camera sometimes turns HDR on without asking, and it usually seems to be a good decision. But I never do it by myself.

@tsturm
Same here, although the Olympus has a small sensor size compared to the full-frames from Canon & Nikon. My sensor is therefore a little more sensitive to big exposure differences.

I tend not to use auto-bracketing. In preference I still use my Cokin filter system, although only when I've also got my tripod.

@wim_v12e

@fitheach @tsturm I had to look up what these terms meant :-) I generally leave my camera (which is a very simple compact) on auto, even when I take pics into the sun.

@wim_v12e
Get any two camera geeks into a (virtual) room, and the talk will invariably turn to acronyms and patented technologies. 😃

Probably little to do with taking good photos, but it makes for an interesting debate.

@tsturm

@fitheach
I'll chip in, you live in part, I in the other, how about?

@zudn
Seems like a plan, though you will still need a million or two GBP.

BTW
I'll take the west wing.

probably not a good idea 

@fitheach

never seen pairs like this in England, and a few years back when I lived in Reading if my friends were out looking for mushrooms it wasn't those they were after (nor traditional edible mushrooms), the below *did* get tried and I can confirm the results were the same as the American chap got..

amanitamuscariamushrooms.blogs

probably not a good idea 

@vfrmedia
Hmmm, I'll stick to just photographing them. 😃

probably not a good idea 

@fitheach there's a risk of ending up very unwell if they are consumed in the wrong way - for this reason they didn't get made class A like all the psylocibin mushrooms that had become popular as recreational substances by the mid 2000s (including artificially grown varieties imported from USA and Canada)

probably not a good idea 

@vfrmedia
It is certainly risky. People have become very unwell, even died, as a result of eating the wrong type of mushrooms.

They might not kill you there and then, but they might be doing irreparable damage to internal organs, which you don't realise until it is too late.

probably not a good idea 

@fitheach ironically those looking for psychedelic mushrooms in Northern Europe are less likely to confuse those with a deadly variety due to wildly different appearances (accidents seem to occur more with those foraging for edible mushrooms) but the problem with the all year round USA imports is the relative lack of effort to get them and the non seasonal nature led to binge use, people (especially teenagers) freaking out and NHS having to pick up the pieces..

probably not a good idea 

@vfrmedia
Because of all the rain this summer, I saw the same thing in town on boulevards beside the sidewalk a few weeks ago.
In fact, if you told me I took that foto and forgot I uploaded it, I'd believe you.
Small, bright and then up to the size of dinner plates.
@fitheach

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