Jogger on the narrow path, noticing staring at him: "Is it OK to pass?

Me: " She'll only give you a slight mauling, nothing too serious".

I don't think he saw my wry smile, indicating I was joking.

Modus vivendi.

sleeps with her back against my legs. If I get up during the night, she moves up to my pillows, and puts her back against them instead. When I return, I have to shove her across the bed to get access to my pillows. Luckily, she doesn't complain. This is just as well, as it takes quite a lot of shoving. 😃

made a special friend during the summer. He is a wee Bichon dog called Haggis. When the weather was good, Haggis was outside, and he and Gruoch could talk. Now, he is kept inside. Every time we pass, Gruoch and Haggis look at each other through the French windows. Haggis barks, and Gruoch just looks. I find it sad that Gruoch is prevented from talking to her "boyfriend".

I am really chuffed with to-day's cleverness.

has a soft kennel that she uses in the house. She loves her wee den.

I bought her a new one for use in the car. She would not use it. So, I swapped the locations of the two kennels, and swapped the internal cushions. Her old kennel was familiar to her in the car, and the new kennel was in a familiar location, in the house.

Dogology.

I've mentioned before that has, without any training, taken it upon herself to wait patiently, while I photograph subjects. I've now noticed that she actually watches the wildlife I'm photographing.

Here she is looking across the canal, directly at the Cormorant, as I'm photographing it.

Eventually, I will just get Gruoch to take the photographs, too.

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Early test report.

suffered terribly from snowballs on his legs. He had short legs with loads of long, curly hair, which exacerbated the problem. Snow boots were never very successful.

is having no such problems. She has long legs, with short, straight hair. Her hair also has a Teflon™ coating. Everything, including snow, just slips off.

Of course, it might be that the current snow (cold and dry) is the wrong type for balling. Time will tell.

DogsOfMastodon

Without me training her, has understood to stop walking, and wait for me, whenever I take a photo or have a pee.

In the former case she recognises the action of me taking my smartphone out of the messenger bag.

I'm not telling you how she knows I'm about to have a pee.

and I had our first ever nightime , with my headtorch. She seemed to be even more excited than normal, although that might have been due to the number of Sika deer about.

The conditions were perfect, too: 2°C, no wind, clear sky, and no rain. If only it could be like this every night.

I love Gruoch's normal doggie smell. So, why is it wet doggie smell is always awful?

When drying a large dog, two small towels work better than a single big one.

It isn't often looks small in comparison to another dog. To-day was one of those occasions. We met a Newfoundland dog. No exaggeration, it was like a horse. Plus, Gruoch has the physique of a sprinter, this Newfie was built like a sumo wrestler. Truly, little and large.

Needless to say, Gruoch wanted to have a square-go. 🙄

I like cats. I *love* dogs.

Lots of (mostly survey) research has been conducted on the differences between "cat people" and "dog people". The results have often been broadly similar, and include:

* cat peeps prefer solitude
* dog peeps are dominant
* cat peeps are smarter
* dog peeps are more sociable

Do you agree? Are you a cool cat or a dominant doggie person?

thoughtcatalog.com/lorenzo-jen

and I were having our usual bedtime games, when I felt she had a tick. It was on her neck, below her left ear.

I got the tick removal tool, the headtorch, and a treat (placed in my breast pocket).

This was the first ever tick removal procedure. It was an ordeal. As soon as I touched the affected area I had to contain a large, struggling dog. At the same time, Gruoch wanted to sniff the tick tool, and eat the treat.

Eventually, we were successful.

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