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lol. i have no idea who steve shives is. But today i heard this guy's name, as famous sjw who blocks people. I went, and lo n behold, i am blocked!

lol.

and, same thing happened with the feminist freq anita fuck. I discovered i was blocked about 3 months ago, even i never visited her twitter or blog.

so, i guess am somewhat famous.

am guessing, they have a network of ban list. sjw leftist tend to do that. On mastodon too.

it's truly puzzling what these severe sjw types is thinking.
Apparently, he's a youtuber.
Is it possible sometimes in the past i posted a comment to his youtube ? not likely, since i rarely do.

how is it possible he blocked me on twitter?? i don't think am a famous anti sjw guy neither.

@xahlee Blockbots with shared lists, users can submit names for blocking with little or no review. Guilt by association if you follow or interact with evil accounts. I seem to be blocked by him as well; have never heard of him before reading your comment here.

@mattskala i see. quite interesting. so on twitter there's account that actively post people who, say, follow certain people? and the reader can just block those?

do you have a example handy?
thanks.

@xahlee I don't think it's coordinated by means of special Twitter accounts (too easy for the C&C account to become a target) but see projects like github.com/freebsdgirl/ggautob (which is one strong reason for me not to support FreeBSD, since they tolerate the author of that)

@mattskala @xahlee I don’t see what’s wrong with that. I only block boring people who get reposted by those I follow, but if there were a 4chan or reddit campaign against me, …!

When I heard Trump was blocking his critics, I didn’t get why this offended them, either.

I don’t suppose there’s a right-wing version of this yet, but don’t be surprised if one arises — as a fork of the repo.

What am I missing?

@wrenpile @xahlee If I block you because I don't want to read your stuff, that's my business. But if I tell 10000 people "Don't read this guy because he's an evil harasser" (today it would be "Nazi" but these systems are a couple years old now), and people take my word for it without checking, is that harmless?

@mattskala @xahlee There’s harm, but it’s widely distributed: largely from the fools who’ve never been attacked but still use the blocking software.

That said, I don’t think I have the right to order people who *are* being attacked not to use the s/w.

If I believe in free thought, I can deplore people burrowing into intellectual holes, but I can’t in good conscience stop them.

@xahlee @mattskala It occurs to me that this is pretty similar to email spam blacklists: what matters is whether you get a lot if spam and how trustworthy a particular list is.

Matthew Skala @mattskala

@wrenpile @xahlee One difference is that most spam blacklists, and all those that serious people take seriously, have a defined appeal process. Also, the incentives to avoid false positives are stronger because false positives *really hurt* for the recipient, not only the sender. That's much less true of twitter blocking.

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@mattskala @xahlee Agree that there should be an appeal process. Maybe there will be one eventually, if only in a competing list.

You’re also right about false positives harming the recipient more in email.