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While walking along the river at Springleaf Nature Park, Singapore, I saw a spot of bright red in the water. Getting closer, I saw it was this Red Water Lily (Nymphaea rubra) in full bloom. Spotted on 19 April, 2019.

On iNaturalist [ inaturalist.org/observations/2 ].

@sohkamyung
... and there is a butterfly resting on one of the petals.

Does it keep opening and display more petals, as time passes?

@fitheach I believe it does. It's not fully opened yet. You can see more pictures of plants similar to it here [ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymphaea ].

BTW, I think that's a moth on the leaf. I didn't notice it at the time, otherwise I would have tried to get a closer look at it.

But if I'm not mistaken, it was a Hydrilla leafcutter moth, a moth with an interesting life as a aquatic caterpillar [ entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/B ]

@sohkamyung
Thought it might. Nymphaea alba are quite common here, particularly as a lily added to ornamental ponds.

Interesting story about potentially using the moth to control Hydrilla verticillata. Using one invasive species to control another. What could possibly go wrong. 😃

@fitheach Yes, a lot of things could go wrong with that idea. :-)

But, if done right, it could work (very species specific). One project I'm keeping an eye on is the project to introduce a parasitic wasp to Christmas Island to control the colonies of invasive Yellow Crazy Ants there. Initial results are encouraging.

Disclosure: I visited the island many years ago to see the Red Crab migration and it was amazing. Not so amazing were the parts infested with ants.

christmas.net.au/discover-chri

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